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Tuesday, 31 January 2017 00:00

Morton's Neuroma: Explained

Morton’s Neuroma, caused by a thickening of tissue around the nerves in your toes, usually happens between the third and fourth toes, causing a feeling like something is stuck in your sock. Your foot, which has more than 100 muscles, 26 bones, and 33 joints, is a very complex structure, and is why foot pain can be so common. Morton’s Neuroma is often treated fairly simply, by things like foot and arch supports, anti-inflammatories, orthotics, and physical therapy. It is always important to discuss with your doctor the best treatment plan that is right for you. This condition must be treated, to ensure that no additional foot complications develop over time.

Morton’s neuroma is a very uncomfortable condition to live with. If you think you have Morton’s neuroma, contact Dr. Brent Kempf of Sayville Foot Care. Our doctor will attend to all of your foot and ankle needs and answer any of your related questions.  

Morton’s Neuroma

Morton's neuroma is a painful foot condition that commonly affects the areas between the second and third or third and fourth toe, although other areas of the foot are also susceptible. Morton’s neuroma is caused by an inflamed nerve in the foot that is being squeezed and aggravated by surrounding bones.

What Increases the Chances of having Morton’s Neuroma?

  • Ill-fitting high heels or shoes that add pressure to the toe or foot
  • Jogging, running or any sport that involves constant impact to the foot
  • Flat feet, bunions, and any other foot deformities

Morton’s neuroma is a very treatable condition. Orthotics and shoe inserts can often be used to alleviate the pain on the forefront of the feet. In more severe cases, corticosteroids can also be prescribed. In order to figure out the best treatment for your neuroma, it’s recommended to seek the care of a podiatrist who can diagnose your condition and provide different treatment options.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Sayville, NY. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Morton's Neuroma
Wednesday, 25 January 2017 00:00

Treating Ingrown Toenails Without Surgery

Ingrown toenails are classified as the growth of the nails into the sides of the skin, resulting in symptoms of pain and irritation. Typically, surgery is considered as an option in helping to correct ingrown toenails, but the following at-home DIY procedure can help. The first step involves soaking your feet in warm water with baking soda and salt. Use a cotton ball soaked in raw honey and a garlic clove to apply space between the end of the nail and skin. The mixture has antiseptic properties and will help with the separation of the ingrown toenail. Do this for at least 15 days, then gradually work toward separating the toenail from the skin.

Ingrown toenails can become painful if they are not treated properly. For more information about ingrown toenails, contact Dr. Brent Kempf of Sayville Foot Care. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Ingrown Toenails

Ingrown toenails occur when a toenail grows sideways into the bed of the nail, causing pain, swelling, and possibly infection.

Causes

  • Bacterial infections
  • Improper nail cutting such as cutting it too short or not straight across
  • Trauma to the toe, such as stubbing, which causes the nail to grow back irregularly
  • Ill-fitting shoes that bunch the toes too close together
  • Genetic predisposition

Prevention

Because ingrown toenails are not something found outside of shoe-wearing cultures, going barefoot as often as possible will decrease the likeliness of developing ingrown toenails. Wearing proper fitting shoes and using proper cutting techniques will also help decrease your risk of developing ingrown toenails.

Treatment

Ingrown toenails are a very treatable foot condition. In minor cases, soaking the affected area in salt or antibacterial soaps will not only help with the ingrown nail itself, but also help prevent any infections from occurring. In more severe cases, surgery is an option. In either case, speaking to your podiatrist about this condition will help you get a better understanding of specific treatment options that are right for you.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Sayville, NY. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Ingrown Toenail Care
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